Self-control and The Model for Improvement

Self-control and The Model for Improvement

The Model for Improvement (here) and Joseph Juran’s definition of self-control (here) have a one-one correspondence:

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Self-control has an implicit Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle, too.   If you or your team have the ingredients of self-control, here’s the implied PDSA sequence:

Plan:  You know what to do, you have a standard procedure for your work, along with expected results.

Do:  You carry out the work.

Study:  You compare the work and the results with the standard and expected results.

Act:  If your work and results match the standard and expected results, continue.  If not, make an appropriate change.

The Act step reveals an issue—what if you don’t have a way to align actual work and results with the standard and expected results?   That means you and your team are not yet autonomously in control of the quality of the work.   Responsibility for quality then lies with others—in most organizations, you will need to connect with from managers who can bring skills and make connections to close the gap between actual and expected work and results.

Primary Care Measurement:  Lake or Stream?

Primary Care Measurement: Lake or Stream?

When Purple Becomes Blue:  Perception Changes With Prevalence

When Purple Becomes Blue: Perception Changes With Prevalence